eTalk Extra: Daylight Saving Time – When We Started, And Why We Do It

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Daylight Saving Time falls on Sunday, March 14, at 2:00 AM. As you move your clocks ahead this year, you may find yourself wonder why and when we started “springing forward” and “falling back.” Daylight Saving Time was first instituted in the United States during World War I in an effort to save energy for war production by taking advantage of the later hours of daylight between April and October. During World War II the government again required the states to observe the time change.

Between the wars and after World War II, states and communities were given the choice to observe Daylight Saving Time or not. In 1966, Congress passed the Uniform Time Act, which standardized the length of Daylight Saving Time. Since then, Daylight Saving Time has been observed in most regions of the United States and Canada.

Since 2007, Daylight Saving Time has been four weeks longer due to the Energy Policy Act. The Act extended Daylight Saving Time by four weeks, hoping to take advantage of the available daylight to even further reducing energy consumption.

This year, Daylight Saving Time falls on Sunday, March 14, at 2:00 AM. So be certain to set your clock ahead one hour before you tuck in for the night, so you’ll rise and shine to the correct time!

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